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Defense News

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(Interviewed by Reporter Chou, Sheng-Wei from Military News Agency) “Here is Xiling Gorge, Wu Gorge, and Qutang Gorge, and I guard here”, said a 95-year-old veteran Chou, Chin-Chiang looking at the map of Yangtze River Basin. He graduated from Navigation Class Year No. 29 of R.O.C. Naval Academy (Mawei) and was distributed to the Badong-Wanlui fort regions to attach the enemy ships sailing on Yangtze River and protect Nationalist Government moving west from Japanese threat. “The fort I station at is located at Shipai. Sometimes I need to go to Wanlui on the other side. I use three-inch cannon”, said Chou, Chin-Chiang, who held a crutch in one hand and pointed at the location on the map using the other hand. Recalling the initial war of resistance against Japan, Chou said that the Navy followed the order to sink old ships in Yangtze River to form a blockade and to dismantle cannons on warships to found forts along Yangtze River. After the commander of war zone assigned the location of fort, engineers of the army helped build bunkers and forts to guard the forts along Yangtze River. Rivers at three Georges flowed fast; levels of rivers varied a lot, which often formed swirls and undercurrent. Thus, the Navy took advantage of terrain at Badong and Wanlui and set up cannons to target at places where rivers flew mildly and ships must travel. “Our cannons have been calibrated. We mark the target clearly in white on the other side and shoot against the target accurately”, said Chou. Protecting forts means huge responsibility without any slackness. What the Navy had for meals every day was very simple. “Rice with steamed or fried soybeans. We had no fire to cook the rice, so we send soldiers to chop firewood in the rear mountain and ask citizens to carry firewood to the riverside and forts”, recalled Chou. Chou, Chin-Chiang is one of the Navy fighting against Japan. His anti-war memory and experiences reflected the story of nobodies in the big time and the actual picture of anti-war veterans and martyrs, who remained at their posts and never fell back. Although Chou did not fight against enemy ships directly when guarding the fort for more than one year, his firm attitude toward sacrifice and efforts are worth admiring and by nationals.